2 comments on “Implementing Restricted Boltzmann Machine with .NET Core”

Implementing Restricted Boltzmann Machine with .NET Core

The code that accompanies this article can be downloaded here. In the previous article, we had a chance to see what is the Restricted Boltzmann Machine and how it functions and learns. The path was bumpy because first, we needed to…

9 comments on “Asynchronous Programming in .NET – Common Mistakes and Best Practices”

Asynchronous Programming in .NET – Common Mistakes and Best Practices

In the previous article, we started analyzing asynchronous programming in .NET world. There we made concerns about how this concept is somewhat misunderstood even though it has been around for more than six years, ie. since .NET 4.5. Using this…

3 comments on “Implementing and testing Repository Pattern using Entity Framework”

Implementing and testing Repository Pattern using Entity Framework

There are many blog posts and misconceptions about Repository Pattern, especially since the introduction of the OR/M libraries, like Entity Framework. In this article, we will investigate why this pattern is still useful, what are the benefits of using it…

3 comments on “Exploring Dependency Injection in C# and Top 3 DI Containers – part 2.”

Exploring Dependency Injection in C# and Top 3 DI Containers – part 2.

In the previous article, we covered some topics that are important for understanding Dependency Injection. We considered that Dependency Injection is not just one principle, but an orchestration of many good practices, like Single Responsibility Principle and Dependency Inversion Principle. Apart from that,…

9 comments on “Abolishing Switch-Case Statement and Pattern Matching in C# 7.0”

Abolishing Switch-Case Statement and Pattern Matching in C# 7.0

There are many arguments on the web regarding the switch-case statement. It seems that half of the programmers think that switch-case statement is actually an anti-pattern, and other half claims there are in fact use cases for this concept. Usually, the…

21 comments on “Different ways to implement Singleton in .NET (and make people hate you along the way)”

Different ways to implement Singleton in .NET (and make people hate you along the way)

The Singleton Pattern is probably the most well-known design patterns that came out of Gang of Four's book Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software. This pattern is one of the creational patterns, and basically, it ensures that only one object of a particular class is created and shared among other members of the system.